2018年11月15日

The Seductive and Surreal Photography of Toiletpaper

A gun drops in the toilet. A woman reclines next to a gigantic lobster. People are accosted by food: A couch is buried under spaghetti; a man is force-fed Corn Flakes. These images—and countless others, these wholesale clothing usa rendered with hyper-saturated color and a deranged sense of humor—are par for the course for Toiletpaper, an 8-year-old publishing project spearheaded by internationally renowned artist Maurizio Cattelan and photographer Pierpaolo Ferrari.

“Maurizio is coming from the art world, and I’m coming from the advertising and fashion world,” Ferrari said over Skype from his studio in Milan. “We wanted to find a space that could be outside of those worlds…a space to be free.” Indeed, it’s this eclectic mix of backgrounds that has made Toiletpaper so thrilling. Both of its founders are at the top of their respective games: Ferrari has an enviable portfolio of clips for the likes of Vogue and Wallpaper*; Cattelan went into so-called “retirement” following a splashy 2011 retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, yet has always kept himself on the art world’s radar—most recently by moonlighting as a curator for a massive new show in Shanghai.

Courtesy of Toiletpaper Magazine.Distributed twice a year as a text-free magazine (the 17th issue is due to publish this winter), Toiletpaper has hit upon an effective formula for success: marshall the look, logic, and production value of commercial advertising, but put it toward absurd and happily pointless ends. Toiletpapertakes the common tropes of things like food photography and high fashion, and pushes them to extremes. The result is a swirling constellation of images that are as tempting and satisfying as candy.

Each issue of Toiletpaper requires a vast crew of collaborators; a typical masthead might credit contributions from antique furniture experts and animal trainers, in addition to the expected set-designers and make-up artists. The venture is akin to “a big, mostly Italian family,” Cattelan explained, “and Pierpaolo and I are like the parents.” That pleasantly dysfunctional family is responsible for an instantly recognizable aesthetic that conjures the oddity of the 21st century.

Courtesy of Toiletpaper Magazine.Ferrari described how a typical Toiletpaper image comes about, beginning with rough sketches or simple ideas bounced between himself and Cattelan. By way of example, Ferrari showed me some representative drawings—heads exploding into nuclear mushroom clouds, or men being kicked in the groin.

These lo-fi inspirations are translated into incredibly slick photographs during intensive studio sessions; each issue of Toiletpaper takes between 5 and 10 days to complete. The goal, Ferrari said, is a “re-elaboration of what you see every day,” but “seeing it again in a surprising way.” Their creative process can be appropriately surreal, as he described: “It’s a bag, then you make a hole, you put a cat inside….”

Animals have, indeed, been prominent in the studio. In one image, a gang of snakes writhe atop a sculptural assortment of cymbals. (“They were moving and often escaping from the set,” Ferrari recalled. “All the girls were screaming.”) In another, an assortment of kittens, ducklings, and one smirking Chihuahua pose inside antique food containers. “We love animals as much as we love humans,” he said. “It’s always a challenge because you don’t know how it will end. We have a very devoted animal trainer.”

Courtesy of Toiletpaper Magazine.Humans might be more predictable, but the challenge is finding models who are willing to take chances. The content is bizarre, unnerving, and even ugly at times. One Toiletpaper cover features a model wearing lush red lipstick, her mouth open to reveal the word “SHIT” written across her front teeth. Ferrari and Cattelan often use bodies to make visual jokes: a man tied to the floor with colorful neckties; an old man stoically “urinating” in a great arc, with a tiny wine cork protruding from his pants instead of the expected anatomy. Images can be goofy—a fried egg, toast, and bacon nailed to a tablecloth—or deeply uncomfortable, loaded with psychosexual tension.

View SlideshowLike advertising, Toiletpaper is seductive and sensual; it wants to be wanted. And that’s the trick that makes flipping through an issue both exhilarating and upsetting—a bit like taking a long drink of what you think is water, only to realize, too late, that it’s milk. The magazine’s polished look sets the brain up to expect something like an Hermès ad, or a spread from Vogue; instead, what we get is a woman putting a cigarette out on her own bejeweled hand, or a nude man reclining on a green velour couch, covered in cats.

The sheer, enormous range of what can end up in the magazine’s pages is what has kept it exciting. Commercial photographers are often typecast into their own niche specialty, but for Cattelan and Ferrari, Toiletpaper is the exact opposite of a creative rut. “We need the challenge, we need to fail,” Ferrari explained. “And okay, sometimes you can make a mistake—but most of the time, you come out with something that’s really outstanding.”

Courtesy of Toiletpaper Magazine.Meanwhile, Toiletpaper continues to evolve. It has grown to include a range of collectable products—furniture, clothing, tableware, an LED lamp shaped like a cat—and even entire environments, like one staged at Art Basel in Miami Beach in 2016. Toiletpaper is more than just a liberating, creative space for Ferrari and Cattelan to flex their quirky muscles and entertain oddball ideas. It’s become a cultural force in its own right, one that is often imitated—if not ripped off best wholesale drop shipping companies—by brands eager to wade into weirder waters. Interestingly, Toiletpaper’s success as an art project has led to advertising partnerships in the real world, from the likes of Kenzo and OKCupid, as well as cover commissions for the New York Times Magazineand other publications.

Toiletpaper forces its disparate fans to cross the aisle—asking fashion audiences to be okay with a little surreality, and coaxing art audiences out of their own, often self-serious bubble. The result is a rare combination of the silly and serious, the conceptual and the flat-out entertaining. And the project doesn’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon, with ambitions that are positively cosmic. “We hope,” Cattelan said, “to see Toiletpaper images in outer space someday.”
  


Posted by lul at 15:28Comments(0)

2018年11月13日

Top 10 car, SUV models in China by October wholesale volume

According to the China Passenger Car Association (CPCA), the PV wholesale volume in China wholesale suppliers evidently dropped 12.7% over a year ago to 2,019,493 units in October, presenting year-on-year (YoY) drop for four consecutive months. The Oct. sales of the car, MPV and SUV were all less than that of a year ago (the "PV" mentioned here refers to cars, SUVs and MPVs locally produced in China).

By the end of October, China's PV wholesale volume cumulated to 18,933,137 units in 2018 with a YoY decrease of 0.7%. The SUV year-to-date (YTD) sales totaled 8,130,946 units, up by 1.4% from the year-ago period. Nevertheless, both car and MPV segments faced YoY drop in YTD sales.

The inventory pressure is getting increasingly higher for dealers with the sales continuously declining. The China Automobile Dealers Association (CADA) said that the Vehicle Inventory Alert Index (VIA) in October was 66.9%, 17 percentage higher than that of a year ago and the highest in the last three years. By October, China has faced the tenth month in the year that the VIA exceeded an official warning threshold.

The CPCA's data show that China's car sales dropped 8.8% YoY to 1.0064 million units in October and edged down 0.1% from the previous year to 9.4341 million units for the first ten months.

The Lavida and the Sylphy were the champion and runner-up of car model by Oct. sales. Both car models had sales exceeding 40,000 units in September and October and the sales gap between the Lavida and Sylphy has diminished to 1,251 units.

The Excelle, ranking the fourth on the list, saw its sales fall 7% over a year ago. Since the 2018 Buick Excelle hit the market in October last year, the sales of this car model had sharply declined to 12,017 units in June and then bounced back to over 29,000 units in September and October thanks to a price slash.

Last month, SUV of chinese wholesale volume shrank 15.1% from a year earlier to 874.2 thousand units. A total of 8.1335 million SUVs were sold through October with a YoY growth of 1.5%.

The Haval H6 still occupied the championship with its Oct. sales exceeding nearly 15 thousand units over the runner-up Tiguan. The automaker started a price cut activity on the Haval branded SUVs from September 1, which indeed boosted the sales performance. Especially, the Oct. sales of the Haval M6 soared 74% to 12,275 units.

The sales of the Honda XR-V presented a great YoY surge of 145.4% in October. Aside from a reasonable price benefit, the model also attracted a number of consumers by its favorable exterior, interior and powertrains.
  


Posted by lul at 13:15Comments(0)

2018年11月09日

Nissan reports first-half results for fiscal year 2018

In the first half, the company’s net revenue fell 2.1% to 5.53 trillion yen. Operating profit fell 25.4% to 210.3 billion yen, equivalent to an operating profit margin of 3.8%. This was largely due to a planned decrease in wholesale boutique volume as part of the company’s ongoing efforts to reduce dealer inventory levels and improve the quality of sales. Thanks to the strength of Nissan’s operations in China, net income1 fell less steeply, declining 10.9% to 246.3 billion yen.

The company’s overall operations improved steadily in the first half despite consistently challenging market conditions. Optimization of global dealer inventory levels is ongoing, and to that end, planned adjustments were made to wholesale volumes in the second quarter. This resulted in a decrease in revenue, although retail sales volumes remained essentially the same as the previous year.

On a regional basis, substantial progress was made in improving the quality of sales by reducing inventories and optimizing incentive levels in the U.S. market. Sales in Japan recovered from the impact of last year’s final vehicle inspection issue. Meanwhile, sales volumes in Thailand, the Philippines and Latin America, in particular, increased substantially. The company’s operations in China also performed well during the period. Nissan will continue efforts to strengthen its business, with the aim of ensuring that performance recovers in the second half.

On a management pro forma basis, which includes the proportionate consolidation of results from Nissan’s joint venture operation in wholesale China, operating profit was 306.7 billion yen, equivalent to an operating margin of 4.9%. Net income1 was 246.3 billion yen.

Sales performance

For the six-month period to Sept. 30, 2018, Nissan’s global vehicle sales fell 1.8% to 2.68 million units. This was equivalent to a global market share of 5.8%, down 0.2 percentage point from a year earlier.

In Japan, Nissan’s sales rose 0.5% to 285,000 vehicles, equivalent to a market share of 11.5%, up 0.1 percentage point from a year earlier, even as Japan’s total industry volume remained little changed at 2.48 million vehicles. Minivehicle model changeovers partly impacted sales figures. However, sales increased from a year earlier thanks to strong demand for models that embody the company’s Nissan Intelligent Mobility vision, including the new Nissan LEAF electric vehicle, the Serena e-POWER minivan, which went on sale in March, and the Nissan Note compact car, which led registered vehicle sales in Japan in the first half of the fiscal year.

In China, where Nissan reports figures by calendar year, vehicle sales rose 10.7% to 720,000 units, representing a market share of 5.4%, up 0.2 percentage point from a year earlier. Strong demand for models including the Nissan Sylphy, X-Trail and Kicks, as well as the Venucia D60, drove the increase.

In the U.S., Nissan’s sales fell 9.1% to 709,000 vehicles, equivalent to a market share of 8.1%.

Nissan sales in Europe, including Russia, fell by 12.1% to 330,000 vehicles, equivalent to a market share of 3.4%. Sales in Russia increased 2.4% to 50,000, equivalent to a market share of 5.6%.

In other markets, including Asia and Oceania, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa, Nissan’s sales rose 4.3% to 407,000 vehicles. Specifically, sales volume increased substantially in Thailand, the Philippines and Brazil.

1 Net income attributable to owners of the parent

2 Since the beginning of fiscal year 2013, Nissan has reported figures calculated under the equity method accounting for its joint venture with Dongfeng in China. Although net income reporting remains unchanged under this accounting method, the equity-accounting income statements no longer include Dong-Feng-Nissan’s results in revenues and operating profit.  


Posted by lul at 11:25Comments(0)

2018年11月07日

Renewables reduced wholesale power costs

There is a lot to chew on in The Economic Value of Renewable Energy to Texas, a new report by the Wind Solar Alliance. In addition to numbers on jobs, reduced pollutants and projected numbers for economic development, there are also figures for revenues to local governments and landowners, all in the cornucopia of economic benefits brought by these two resources.


However, perhaps the most interesting thing in this report – which represents the latest joint effort of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) – are the numbers on how wind, and to a lesser degree solar, are bringing down wholesale power prices and making them more stable.


This speaks to not only how renewable energy is ushering in a new era of super-cheap electricity, but also provides the secret to how wind and solar will increasingly drive more expensive and uncompetitive conventional power plants off the grid in wholesale boutique clothing power markets.


Zero marginal cost


The fundamental magic of this, as detailed in the report, is the phenomenon of zero marginal cost. Because wind and solar have no fuel cost, low operations and maintenance costs and do not suffer the wear due to rampinFg that thermal generation does, it’s pretty much the same cost to the plant whether it is generating power or not.


As such wind and solar bid into wholesale power markets at very low cost, and are usually dispatched first.


In Texas in 2017, this was not a small amount of wind and solar. The 20 GW of wind and 1 GW of solar made up 17.4% and 0.8% respectively of the electricity consumed in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid represented quite a volume of resources bidding in at next to zero.


Particularly when coupled with low gas prices, this is bringing down the cost of generation. As shown in the figure below, at 40 GW of demand and a gas price of $3.50 per MMBTU, even 10 GW of wind and/or solar keeps the bid price just below $30 per megawatt-hour. This prevents not only the most expensive gas plants – such as less efficient simple-cycle plants – from clearing but also most of the coal plants in the fleet.


The report finds that negative prices are relatively rare and usually are due to transmission congestion in West Texas.


2.8%-8.2% fall in wholesale costs


The phenomenon of zero marginal cost generation depressing prices is not new, but what Joshua Rhodes of IdeaSmiths, the author of this portion of the report, has done is to put numbers to just how much this is affecting prices in ERCOT.


Rhodes’ modeling found that found that wind and solar have reduced wholesale power prices by an average of between $1 and $2.50 per megawatt-hour each year from 2010 through 2017, resulting in prices that were between 2.8% and 8.2% lower than they would have been without these resources.


Over the course of these eight years, Rhodes estimates that reduced wholesale power prices by $5.7 billion – or about $700 million annually, or ~$25 for every resident of Texas each year. He also found that the effect is greater during years when gas prices are higher, and that as such wind and solar are not only making cheap wholesale clothing, but also dampening price volatility.


A future of cheap power


This is just the beginning. Texas continues to add more wind every year, and ERCOT has estimated that the state could put online 13 GW of solar by 2030. This will ultimately mean more hours where coal and gas plants are not operating, and more retirements of conventional generation.


While the report focuses on Texas, it is not hard to extrapolate this scenario across the entire United States. Significant volumes of wind are present on the MISO grid, and New England saw its first “duck curve” day where mid-day net demand fell to a lower level than overnight demand due to high levels of solar.


It is important to note that the zero marginal cost of wind and solar generation will not discriminate between types of plants, knocking off whatever plants are the most expensive and must run the most to pay off their loans. This is why much of the 110 GW of gas plants planned for the United States may become stranded assets, if utilities and developers insist upon building them.


While some wholesale market design may be necessary to keep sufficient reserves – particularly if such market design rewards flexible generation – the fall of wholesale power prices is good news for consumers, who get cheaper power at more stable prices. It also helps industry, which becomes more competitive when the price of one key input – electricity – falls.


And, of course, there are the jobs, tax revenues, lease payments, and economic development benefits. But that’s for another time.

  


Posted by lul at 12:29Comments(0)

2018年11月02日

Blend Chic Fashion With a Sustainable Lifestyle

  Starting with a friendship that has grown for more than 10 years and apparel-industry experience that has spanned their entire careers, Alexx Monkarsh, Molly Levin and Wells Butler wanted to create a positive impact through clothing.

  The trio decided to collaborate on a sustainable, socially conscious brand of apparel that stands apart by creating an online eco-conscious fashion-lifestyle destination. Named Dame, the brand launched in Los Angeles on Nov. 1 with manufacturing based in downtown L.A.

  “When I was done with my previous line, I connected with Molly, who is also my sister-in-law and a stylist,” said Monkarsh, a Los Angeles native whose previous label was Alexx Jae and Milk. Her mother is Debbie Levin, president of the Environmental Media Association. “We wanted to start this direct-to-consumer fashion world that provides a great uniform for women and also a styling component.”

  As a stylist, Levin brought a fashion expertise to Dame that allows the brand to expand into the lifestyle category. This reach will see the brand providing styling tips with each purchase and serving as an online destination where clients can find the input of fashionable guests, which will include actress Malin Akerman, known for her role as Lara Axelrod in the TV series “Billions.”

  “Nine times out of 10, somebody sees something online, thinks it’s super cute, orders it and doesn’t know how to put it together after it arrives,” said Levin, who also grew up in Los Angeles. “Wouldn’t it be nice to include a style card with everything that they order? We’re providing style cards to build their confidence so they can know that they, too, can be a stylist.”

  In addition to manufacturing limited-run pieces from upcyStarting with a friendship that has grown for more than 10 years and apparel-industry experience that has spanned their entire careers, Alexx Monkarsh, Molly Levin and Wells Butler wanted to create a positive impact through wholesale boutique clothing.

  The trio decided to collaborate on a sustainable, socially conscious brand of apparel that stands apart by creating an online eco-conscious fashion-lifestyle destination. Named Dame, the brand launched in Los Angeles on Nov. 1 with manufacturing based in downtown L.A.

  “When I was done with my previous line, I connected with Molly, who is also my sister-in-law and a stylist,” said Monkarsh, a Los Angeles native whose previous label was Alexx Jae and Milk. Her mother is Debbie Levin, president of the Environmental Media Association. “We wanted to start this direct-to-consumer fashion world that provides a great uniform for women and also a styling component.”

  As a stylist, Levin brought a fashion expertise to Dame that allows the brand to expand into the lifestyle category. This reach will see the brand providing styling tips with each purchase and serving as an online destination where clients can find the input of fashionable guests, which will include actress Malin Akerman, known for her role as Lara Axelrod in the TV series “Billions.”

  “Nine times out of 10, somebody sees something online, thinks it’s super cute, orders it and doesn’t know how to put it together after it arrives,” said Levin, who also grew up in Los Angeles. “Wouldn’t it be nice to include a style card with everything that they order? We’re providing style cards to build their confidence so they can know that they, too, can be a stylist.”

  In addition to manufacturing limited-run pieces from upcycled dead stock, the company sells vintage styles that complement the collection. The company’s pieces will be released nearly every month, and vintage stock will be consistently refreshed as new pieces are sourced.

  “The fashion market is so saturated,” said Butler, the owner of Prinp Clothing line. She grew up in the Midwest, where she relied on shopping for vintage pieces to re-create on-trend looks. “In order to set yourself apart, you have to have a different component,” she said. “I love the hunt, going through racks to find special pieces, and it’s something that I enjoy doing for Dame.”

  Each limited-run collection will include 11 to 15 basics created in beautiful fabrics from quality dead stock. For its first Back-to-Basics collection of T-shirts, tank tops, blouses and pants, Dame is launching with easy-to-style pieces that complement one another.

  “We wanted to start our line with the base of a client’s wardrobe—the building blocks of your closet,” Monkarsh said. “We’re all mothers, working women and busy, but we want to grab something that is easy to go while still looking chic and tailored.”

  For their clients, the Dame women want to provide options to appear effortlessly styled by allowing the company to plan their wardrobe. It was through their own personal difficulties balancing their demanding lives with looking chic that the women devised a plan for Dame.

  “Less and less do I want to think about serious outfits: jeans, a belt, blouse, a blazer, shoes and the right bag,” Levin said. “I have to grab something quick, which doesn’t require a lot of thought and is comfortable, but I have to look nice when going to a fitting or pulling pieces in Beverly Hills.”

  For the founders, it was extremely important to choose a manufacturing partner whose practices were ethical and offered fair wages in addition to having sustainable-apparel creation. By making their EMA Green Seal–approved clothes locally, the women are reducing their business’s carbon footprint and supporting Los Angeles’ economy.

  “They are awesome and want to be as green as possible,” Monkarsh said of the unnamed factory where Dame is manufactured. “In 10 years, I hope we live in a world where brands do sustainable fashion and consumers are conscious about what they’re wearing,” she said.

  As upcycling and clothing resale rise in popularity among consumers, Butler emphasizes the flexibility that manufacturers and shoppers have when choosing sustainable-apparel options.

  “Sustainable cheap clothing websites could be anything,” she said. “You could do couture that is sustainable.”

  The handcrafted pieces in the Dame collection are sized XS to L, which will fit a standard size 10 or 12. Fabrics are sourced by Tori Monkarsh, Alexx’s niece and the company’s production and development lead, who scours the city for fabric resources.

  In addition to the T-shirts, tank tops, pants and blouses, the women were sure to include a kimono jumpsuit, slipdress and a comfortable, yet stylish, blazer, which can be paired with any piece in the collection to add a classic look.

  “We’re combining elevated basics that we are manufacturing ourselves, with vintage, and those are the perfect elements of the best wardrobe,” Butler explained. “All you need are elevated basics, including cotton/Modal T-shirts, and these whimsical vintage pieces—such as vintage high-waisted Levi’s, Indian block-printed dresses and skirts—and you’re good to go.”

  During the holidays, between its first and second collections, Dame will release a limited-edition Cozy Box, which includes a loungewear set with a sweatshirt and pants that can be monogrammed by the company. The women designed the pieces to be comfortable enough for opening holiday gifts or running out to grab a bite to eat.

  Price points for the first collection range from just under $60 for dead-stock-sourced cotton/Modal tank tops to V-neck and muscle T-shirts for $250. While they might eventually launch pop-up shops, the women intend to continue their direct-to-consumer model in an effort to maintain affordability and a sustainable supply chain.

  “More and more, direct-to-consumer is what you’re going to see,” Levin said. “It’s essentially wholesale, and we’re able to keep the price down. To be able to keep an approachable price point, I feel it will be what we see more of these days.”

  The direct-to-consumer model also aligns with Dame’s mission to help women easily find fashionable, ecologically responsible clothing. Providing this ease in shopping allows women to enjoy their lives while looking stylish.

  “We’re offering busy women a one-stop shop for the best wardrobe, and that is invaluable. Continue to build your life but not sacrifice your wardrobe,” Butler said. “We’re helping to build your wardrobe so you can build your life.”

  cled dead stock, the company sells vintage styles that complement the collection. The company’s pieces will be released nearly every month, and vintage stock will be consistently refreshed as new pieces are sourced.

  “The fashion market is so saturated,” said Butler, the owner of Prinp Clothing line. She grew up in the Midwest, where she relied on shopping for vintage pieces to re-create on-trend looks. “In order to set yourself apart, you have to have a different component,” she said. “I love the hunt, going through racks to find special pieces, and it’s something that I enjoy doing for Dame.”

  Each limited-run collection will include 11 to 15 basics created in beautiful fabrics from quality dead stock. For its first Back-to-Basics collection of T-shirts, tank tops, blouses and pants, Dame is launching with easy-to-style pieces that complement one another.

  “We wanted to start our line with the base of a client’s wardrobe—the building blocks of your closet,” Monkarsh said. “We’re all mothers, working women and busy, but we want to grab something that is easy to go while still looking chic and tailored.”

  For their clients, the Dame women want to provide options to appear effortlessly styled by allowing the company to plan their wardrobe. It was through their own personal difficulties balancing their demanding lives with looking chic that the women devised a plan for Dame.

  “Less and less do I want to think about serious outfits: jeans, a belt, blouse, a blazer, shoes and the right bag,” Levin said. “I have to grab something quick, which doesn’t require a lot of thought and is comfortable, but I have to look nice when going to a fitting or pulling pieces in Beverly Hills.”

  For the founders, it was extremely important to choose a manufacturing partner whose practices were ethical and offered fair wages in addition to having sustainable-apparel creation. By making their EMA Green Seal–approved clothes locally, the women are reducing their business’s carbon footprint and supporting Los Angeles’ economy.

  “They are awesome and want to be as green as possible,” Monkarsh said of the unnamed factory where Dame is manufactured. “In 10 years, I hope we live in a world where brands do sustainable fashion and consumers are conscious about what they’re wearing,” she said.

  As upcycling and clothing resale rise in popularity among consumers, Butler emphasizes the flexibility that manufacturers and shoppers have when choosing sustainable-apparel options.

  “Sustainable clothing could be anything,” she said. “You could do couture that is sustainable.”

  The handcrafted pieces in the Dame collection are sized XS to L, which will fit a standard size 10 or 12. Fabrics are sourced by Tori Monkarsh, Alexx’s niece and the company’s production and development lead, who scours the city for fabric resources.

  In addition to the T-shirts, tank tops, pants and blouses, the women were sure to include a kimono jumpsuit, slipdress and a comfortable, yet stylish, blazer, which can be paired with any piece in the collection to add a classic look.

  “We’re combining elevated basics that we are manufacturing ourselves, with vintage, and those are the perfect elements of the best wardrobe,” Butler explained. “All you need are elevated basics, including cotton/Modal T-shirts, and these whimsical vintage pieces—such as vintage high-waisted Levi’s, Indian block-printed dresses and skirts—and you’re good to go.”

  During the holidays, between its first and second collections, Dame will release a limited-edition Cozy Box, which includes a loungewear set with a sweatshirt and pants that can be monogrammed by the company. The women designed the pieces to be comfortable enough for opening holiday gifts or running out to grab a bite to eat.

  Price points for the first collection range from just under $60 for dead-stock-sourced cotton/Modal tank tops to V-neck and muscle T-shirts for $250. While they might eventually launch pop-up shops, the women intend to continue their direct-to-consumer model in an effort to maintain affordability and a sustainable supply chain.

  “More and more, direct-to-consumer is what you’re going to see,” Levin said. “It’s essentially wholesale, and we’re able to keep the price down. To be able to keep an approachable price point, I feel it will be what we see more of these days.”

  The direct-to-consumer model also aligns with Dame’s mission to help women easily find fashionable, ecologically responsible clothing. Providing this ease in shopping allows women to enjoy their lives while looking stylish.

  “We’re offering busy women a one-stop shop for the best wardrobe, and that is invaluable. Continue to build your life but not sacrifice your wardrobe,” Butler said. “We’re helping to build your wardrobe so you can build your life.”